HOW COUPLES MEET AND STAY TOGETHER

Links to the Visualisation

https://flowingdata.com/2019/03/26/relationship-stages/

https://flowingdata.com/2019/03/15/shifts-in-how-couples-meet-online-takes-the-top-spot/

WHAT IS THIS VISUALISATION ABOUT?

The purpose of this study is to bring knowledge of how couples meet up‐to‐date by asking detailed questions about both the timing and the social contexts of how Americans meet their romantic partners. Same‐sex couples have been oversampled both in order to provide better information about the difficult‐to‐study sexual minority population, and in order to provide new perspectives on the changing nature of same‐sex couple mating in the US. Another key purpose is to examine how technology, specifically online dating and cell phone apps like Tinder and Grindr, affect relationship formation, relationship quality, attachment to the idea of monogamy, and relationship stability. The survey was conducted using sample from KnowledgePanel(spoken about in “HOW WAS THE DATA COLLECTED” section).


A few snapshots of the visualisation indicating status at different time intervals

A positive correlation can be derived from this data regarding how people meet each other, what does it say about the norms of the society then, how have people’s personalities been, what have people been spending most of their day-to-day time doing and how each of these things influence who/what type of counterpart they meet and the path that the relationship takes.

WHAT IS THE DATA?

HOW WAS THE DATA COLLECTED?

The data was collected for a survey by the Stanford University named “How Couples Meet and Stay Together(HCMST)” from the SSDS Social Science Data Collection Repository. The data has been divided between datasets for people’s responses along with their past partners and datasets for people’s responses with their current partners. A few noteworthy points are listed below:

WHAT QUESTIONS DO PEOPLE WANT TO ASK?

PROS

CONS

INTERESTING INSIGHTS

PRESS COVERAGE ON THIS TOPIC

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Listed below are a few research papers based on this study(2009 and 2017 versions) by Stanford.

REFERENCES

  1. https://data.stanford.edu/hcmst2017